The Bow Stones

The Bow Stones are two up-right stones on the highest part of the moorland above Lyme Park. The origin of these two stones is unknown, but it has been suggested that they might have had some religious significance.
In Lyme Hall itself, there are two Anglo-Saxon Crosses which were found near the parish church. In the churchyard there is a stone block in which there are two holes which is believed to be the base of the crosses. From a view finder plaque (presented by the Society for the Protection of Rural England in 1975) on the nearbyGritstone Trail near the Bow Stones, it is possible to see seven counties (Cheshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire,  Clwyd, Yorkshire, Shropshire and Lancashire).

source: http://disleyparishcouncil.org.uk/discover-disley/places-of-interest/

Gritstone Trail

Disley is also the starting point of the Gritstone Trail. With its outstanding countryside, wonderful views and natural riches, the 35 mile/56 kilometre Gritstone Trail is both a challenge and a delight. The trail stretches from Disley  to Kidsgrove in the south.  In between walkers can enjoy outstanding views, industrial heritage, historic monuments, fascinating follies and abundant wildlife.

source: http://disleyparishcouncil.org.uk/discover-disley/places-of-interest/

Red Deer & Cage at Lyme Park

Disley is also home to one of the National Trust’s most popular and prestigious properties, Lyme Park. The park’s 1400 acres contain large herds of red and fallow deer with magnificent views across the Cheshire Plain. At St Mary’s Church there is the grave of Joseph Watson (born 1648), who lived to be 104 and was park keeper at Lyme for 64 years. Watson drove a brace of stags from Lyme to Windsor as a present for Queen Anne to win a 500 guinea wager for his master.

source: http://disleyparishcouncil.org.uk/discover-disley/places-of-interest/